Liberal Arts/Sciences Course Descriptions

*Classes marked as eCombination with an * are courses in which some traditional face-to-face "Seat time" has been replaced by online learning activities.  A blended (hybrid) course is designed to integrate face-to-face and online activities so that they reinforce, complement, and elaborate one another.  Platt College currently uses a 60/40 split, meaning that 60% of the course is taught face-to-face, and 40% of the course is taught online. 

Biology

BIOL 112* (eCombination) (4.5 Credits) Nutrition in Health and Illness: This course introduces the student to the fundamental principles of nutrition in health and illness through the lifespan.  Analysis of personal dietary habits and behavior in relation to basic human nutritional needs and food composition as well as health promotion strategies will be explored.

BIOL 206 (6.0 Credits) Introduction to Microbiology (with lab): An introductory course related to biology and classification of microorganisms, their interrelationship with other bacteria, animals, and humans.  Content includes viruses, rickettsia, protozoans, and parasites.  Students apply learned concepts and principles in a laboratory environment. Prerequisites: BIOL 223; BIOL 224. Corequisites: NSG 282/282L/282P.

BIOL 223 (6.0 Credits) Human Anatomy and Physiology I (with lab): Study of human anatomy and physiology designed for students who require a thorough understanding of the structural and functional aspects of the human body across the lifespan. The student will study cellular, tissue, organ, and organ systems that comprise the human being.  The content has been divided into BIOL 223 and BIOL 224.  Students apply learned concepts and principles in a laboratory environment. 

BIOL 224 (6.0 Credits) Human Anatomy and Physiology II (with lab): A continued study of human anatomy and physiology designed for students who require a thorough understanding of the structural and functional aspects of the human body across the life span. The student will study cellular, tissue, organ, and organ systems that comprise the human being. The content has been divided in to BIOL 223 and BIOL 224.  Students apply learned concepts and principles in a laboratory environment.  Prerequisite: BIOL 223.

BIOL 300 (6.0 Credits) Pathophysiology (with lab): This course will provide the student with conceptual and theoretical information applicable to pathological conditions resultant in alterations across the lifespan. Mechanisms of production of signs and symptoms of different disease syndromes will be discussed. A body systems approach will allow the student to understand the mechanisms underlying the disease and the clinical manifestations exhibited.  Students apply learned concepts and principles within a laboratory environment with an emphasis on the use of critical thinking skills.  Prerequisites: BIOL 206; BIOL 223; BIOL 224, NSG 282/282L/282P.  Corequisites: NSG 250/250L/250P; NSG 290.

Chemistry

CHEM 121 (6.0 Credits) General Chemistry (with lab): This course will provide the student with a general overview of chemistry concepts and theories. The student will study matter, atoms, elements, compounds, and reactions. Students apply learned concepts and principles within a laboratory environment. Prerequisites: BIOL 223; BIOL 224.

Communications

COM 210 (4.5 Credits) Speech Communications: This course focuses on interpersonal and intrapersonal aspects of public speaking.  Oral communication theory is discussed.  Students receive practice in different communication genres.

English

ENG 121* (eCombination) (4.5 Credits) Reading and Writing in College I: A course designed to help students analyze a variety of academic texts and complete a series of writing assignments designed to teach them how to interpret arguments, identify constraints and bias, conduct, organize and present research.      

History

HS 150* (eCombination) (4.5 Credits) U.S. History and Government: This course is a review in U.S. history and an examination of how events have shaped our present government.  Emphasis will be placed on governmental organization and how each student fits into their process to become a responsible citizen and voter.

Humanities

HUM 101* (eCombination) (4.5 Credits) Arts and Culture: An Introduction to Humanities: A survey course on Art and Culture from ancient civilizations to the present with emphasis on the interaction of architecture, art, culture, literature, and daily life.

Mathematics

MAT 121 (4.5 Credits) College Algebra: A college algebra course containing a review of selected concepts of intermediate algebra; solving linear and quadratic equations; properties and graphs of function; exponential and logarithmic functions and equations and solving systems of equations.  Applications of algebraic concepts will be integrated throughout the course. 

Philosophy

PHIL 112* (eCombination) (4.5 Credits) Critical Thinking: This course will explore and develop each student’s critical thinking skills through classroom discussions and written arguments.  Topics will include: mastering the fundamentals of critical thinking, evaluation arguments, recognizing errors in thinking, and characteristics of critical thinkers.

Psychology

PSY 101* (eCombination) (4.5 Credits) Introduction to Psychology: This course provides a general understanding of psychology as a behavioral science, psychological concepts and principles.  Topics covered include biological bases of behavior, learning, thinking, motivations, sensation, and perception. 

PSY 151 (4.5 Credits) Human Growth and Development: Survey of human growth and development from conception through senescence.  A multi-disciplinary approach to the study of both change and stability in physical, cognitive, social and personality development.  Review of relevant developmental theory and research. 

Sociology

SOC 101* (eCombination) (4.5 Credits) Introduction to Sociology: This course provides a general understanding of the basic concepts and principles of sociology that affect the individual in society. 

Statistics

STAT 250 (4.5 Credits) Introduction to Applied Statistics: This course focuses on an introduction to applied statistics, including such topics as univariate and multivariate analyses, histograms, linear correlations, analysis of variance, and hypothesis testing. Stratification, intergroup relations and inequalities are covered. Corequisites: NSG 388/388P.